Locate a Squirrel Wildlife Rehabber

Welcome To The “Wisconsin Squirrel Connection”

Provided by Susan S. Saliga, Wisconsin Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator - NWRA/WWRA

Specializing in the care of wild infant and juvenile squirrels.

mailto:squirlwhirl@wi.rr.com

YOU FOUND A BABY SQUIRREL!

WHAT TO DO NEXT...

Sometimes a squirrel mother moves her babies from one nest to another, and will place a baby temporarily on the ground as she moves each baby. In this case, the baby is not orphaned. If the baby does not appear to be ill or injured, and you think the mother squirrel may be alive, it's best to try to get the mother to come and get her baby.

To find out how to do this, CLICK HERE.

If you are reasonably sure the baby squirrel is orphaned or injured, or if the mother does not return to get the baby within 2 hours or before dark, CLICK HERE for instructions on how to rescue the baby, and contact a wildlife rehabber.

Often people ask if a young squirrel is old enough to be on its own, or if it is orphaned. An older baby that already has grown a bushy tail, like the one in the picture below, will usually keep its distance from you.

However, if a young squirrel at this age follows you, it may indicate that he has lost his mother and is hungry, or may need medical attention. Contact a wildlife rehabber for further instructions.

FOR A LIST OF SQUIRREL REHABBERS IN WISCONSIN: CLICK HERE

Wisconsin Wildlife Rehabilitation Directory

FOR A LIST OF SQUIRREL REHABBERS IN ANY OTHER STATE, go to:

Squirrel-Rehab.org

Wildlife Rehabber

These sites have wildlife rehabbers listed for each state.

IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO CONTACT A REHABBER, CLICK HERE.

What to Do Until You Find a Rehabber

Note: Never feed a baby squirrel regular cow's milk, as it can make them very ill!

The baby squirrel in the following photo is eating a specially ordered formula, made for the unique nutritional needs of developing squirrels – it is not milk. Feeding a baby squirrel not only requires a special formula that meets their particular nutritional needs, but appropriate small feeding equipment as well. Improper feeding technique can cause inhalation pneumonia, which can lead to death of the baby. In addition, wildlife can have internal parasites and other illnesses that may not be apparent without an examination by a wildlife rehabber.

Do not attempt to raise baby wildlife on your own!

If you find an orphaned wild baby, call a local rehabber immediately. Amazing as it sounds, wildlife rehabbers do not charge for their services. Licensed wildlife rehabbers are highly trained, and dedicated to helping wildlife that need temporary emergency care. If you would like to become a rehabber or volunteer, contact some of the rehabbers listed in your area. Wildlife rehab facilities are always looking for volunteers. It's a great way to learn about wildlife rehab and feels so good to help! (There are many ways to volunteer at a rehab facility besides direct animal care as well). This little squirrel sure is happy he's getting the best care possible...

Home